A different kind of Anzac Day

Tristan Wheeler and Tari JeffersManjimup-Bridgetown Times
On Anzac Day, Manjimup RSL president Rex Brown visited the Manjimup Gateway Hotel, where owner Paul Fowler and his staff were providing a drive-through sausage sizzle to raise money for the local RSL.
Camera IconOn Anzac Day, Manjimup RSL president Rex Brown visited the Manjimup Gateway Hotel, where owner Paul Fowler and his staff were providing a drive-through sausage sizzle to raise money for the local RSL. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

The Lower South West community commemorated Anzac Day differently this year, but with no less passion.

In Manjimup, RSL president Rex Brown played the Last Post from his house at dawn, which could be heard out of town.

Piper Robertson, 3, of Manjimup visited the Manjimup War Memorial on Saturday to honour all those who served in war, including her great grandfather.
Camera IconPiper Robertson, 3, of Manjimup visited the Manjimup War Memorial on Saturday to honour all those who served in war, including her great grandfather. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

From 10am to 1pm, the Manjimup Gateway Hotel team held a drive through sausage sizzle to raise money for the Manjimup RSL.

“We were able to do this and there was nothing else on offer,” Gateway owner Paul Fowler said.

“I could see in the eyes of our local RSL members that they were sad there wasn’t an Anzac Day service, so we wanted to do what we could.”

Mr Brown said the Gateway team was providing an outstanding service.

“It — and other things like this — are trying to keep our spirits up,” he said.

Giant poppies and pennants on display at the Manjimup RSL Hall's tank, created by Doug and Rose Moyle, with Suzzanne Cully.
Camera IconGiant poppies and pennants on display at the Manjimup RSL Hall's tank, created by Doug and Rose Moyle, with Suzzanne Cully. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

There was also a lot of wreaths laid at the Manjimup War Memorial and a display of giant poppies at the Manjimup RSL Hall.

Bridgetown celebrated Anzac Day differently this year, due to the COVID-19 Pandemic.

At 5.55 am, the Last Post was played from Sutton's Lookout, followed by a minute's silence and then Reveille.

As the sounds of the Last Post rang throughout the valley, red lights were visible from the surrounding areas, with people shining cellophane covered torches to represent the poppy.

Once Reveille had concluded, the Bridgetown bellringers rang their bells, signalled by an amplified bell from the lookout.

The songs were performed by Bridgetown's Tim Streeter, who usually plays the bugle at the Greenbushes Anzac Day ceremony.

Tim Streeter played the Last Post and Reveille.
Camera IconTim Streeter played the Last Post and Reveille.

“Someone suggested that we do something different and my daughter actually suggested that we come up here... and do the bugling from here,” he said.

“It kind of took off from there.”

Across town another tribute was occurring, with Shannon Hartwell dressed in full light horse garb, riding her horse in the streets of Bridgetown, in front of 94-year-old veteran Vernon Daulby.

94-year-old Vernon Daulby observed Anzac Day at the end of his driveway.
Camera Icon94-year-old Vernon Daulby observed Anzac Day at the end of his driveway. Credit: Tristan Wheeler/Manjimup-Bridgetown Times, Tristan Wheeler

Mr Dauby served in the Second World War and said Anzac Day was a reminder of the cost of war.

“Anzac Day is a day for all Australians, whoever you are, wherever you come from,” he said.

Shannon Hartwell in her Light Horse Brigade garb.
Camera IconShannon Hartwell in her Light Horse Brigade garb. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

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