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Community mourns loss of stalwart

Tari JeffersManjimup-Bridgetown Times

The Pemberton community has rallied around a local family after the death of resident Lorna Drake.

Mrs Drake died on December 8 and is being remembered by her family and friends as a passionate person who cared about her community.

Rosalind Piper, one of Mrs Drake’s seven children, said her mother loved nature, antiques and English manners.

“She liked nothing more than setting up an afternoon tea ‘properly’ with china and proper table settings,” Mrs Piper said.

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“She should have been a writer but she was too excited for life.

“She didn’t have the time and said she wanted to live life.”

Lorna Drake, front, on one of her last bird walks with three of her children, Diana Norburn and Gavin and Tony Drake.
Camera IconLorna Drake, front, on one of her last bird walks with three of her children, Diana Norburn and Gavin and Tony Drake. Credit: Lorna Drake, front, on one of her last bird walks with three of her children, Diana Norburn and Gavin and Tony Drake. Picture s, supplied

Mrs Drake moved to Pemberton with her family in 1966.

During this time, her family owned the garage which is now the BP and in the late 1970s, built the Gloucester Motel.

“It was a good time for Pemberton because so many people were coming through the town,” Mrs Piper said.

Mrs Drake later moved to Perth before returning to Pemberton in the late 1990s, where she helped re-establish the CWA and was involved in the movement to stop the swimming pool from getting filled in.

“She was very involved in the community and was very respectful of the region’s tourism pioneers,” Mrs Piper said.

Mrs Drake was a regular contributor to the Manjimup-Bridgetown Times letters to the editor section.

“She was basically trying to bring what’s important to people’s attention and encouraged people to send in letters in response,” Mrs Piper said.

Mrs Piper said her mother was friendly and always happy to talk to people.

“We have had fabulous support from the community,” she said.

“We’ve had such beautiful letters, cards and emails from people all over the world.”

Mrs Piper said her mother had been active right up until her death, including going to bridge and knitting.

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