Naidoc event keeps culture alive

Tari JeffersManjimup-Bridgetown Times
Manjimup Primary School student Shayden Bennell, 6, works on his personalised boomerang during the school's NAIDOC celebrations on Thursday.
Camera IconManjimup Primary School student Shayden Bennell, 6, works on his personalised boomerang during the school's NAIDOC celebrations on Thursday. Credit: Tari Jeffers

Manjimup Primary School celebrated Australia’s indigenous community with a variety of activities to honour Naidoc Week.

Students from kindergarten through to Year 6 enjoyed the wide variety of activities during a special day on Thursday.

Activities included painting wooden boomerangs, tracing footprints on calico, creating beaded bracelets for mums, hand-printed etchings, chalk symbols on cement, face painting, playing traditional games, a slide show of famous indigenous women and making damper with honey.

BJ, 7, Lilley, 3, Samantha, 5, and Jasmine Reid, 18 months, with mum Emily Miller, all of Manjimup, show off their colourful Naidoc shirts.
Camera IconBJ, 7, Lilley, 3, Samantha, 5, and Jasmine Reid, 18 months, with mum Emily Miller, all of Manjimup, show off their colourful Naidoc shirts. Credit: Tari Jeffers

The school’s Aboriginal and Islander education officer Tracy Hansen said the children loved the day and had been “hyped” for it in the lead up to the event.

“Naidoc teaches it is important to be inclusive, keep traditions going and have people learn what Naidoc is all about,” she said.

Elizabeth Herdigan, 9, Raymond Mayers, 11, Christopher Toigo, 7, and Mandy Mayers, 6, display their hand etchings.
Camera IconElizabeth Herdigan, 9, Raymond Mayers, 11, Christopher Toigo, 7, and Mandy Mayers, 6, display their hand etchings. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times/Tari Jeffers

Teacher Jill Woollams said inclusivity and events like Naidoc Week built a respect and care for others.

“Culture is like a quilt, by themselves, they’re alone, but together they’re a quilt of culture,” she said.

This year’s Naidoc Week theme was Because of Her, We Can.

William Jones, 9, works on his footprint in calico design.
Camera IconWilliam Jones, 9, works on his footprint in calico design. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times/Tari Jeffers
Manjimup Primary School students do each other's face painting on Thursday.
Camera IconManjimup Primary School students do each other's face painting on Thursday. Credit: Tari Jeffers
Tito Read, 8, Julia Gledhill, 11, Kaitlyn Haisma, 7, Tessa Edwards, 11, and Montanah Mayor, 11, with their beaded bracelets that would be gifts for their mums.
Camera IconTito Read, 8, Julia Gledhill, 11, Kaitlyn Haisma, 7, Tessa Edwards, 11, and Montanah Mayor, 11, with their beaded bracelets that would be gifts for their mums. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times/Tari Jeffers

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