Top three reads in this week’s Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

Staff reportersManjimup-Bridgetown Times
Hillview Orchard's Louis Vellios.
Camera IconHillview Orchard's Louis Vellios. Credit: Manjimup-Bridgetown Times

In this week’s Manjimup-Bridgetown Times concerns are raised over the lack of doctors in Boyup Brook, it’s a slow start to the cherry season and a local business has lost its staff over mandatory vaccinations.

One doctor for whole town

Emergency patients in a Lower South West town served by just one doctor claim they are facing agonisingly long waits to see a medical professional unless they can drive 35km to the nearest 24-hour hospital.

Boyup Brook residents say they are “horrified” at what could happen if they find themselves in a life-threatening crisis while the town’s doctor is not available.

Tough start for cherries

The market may have to wait a little longer for perfect Manjimup cherries as growers face more challenges with rain and colder weather than normal at this time of the year.

Manjimup cherry grower Louis Vellios, pictured, has been growing cherries at his Hillview Orchard for 18 years and said he had never seen a start to the season this bad, with his crop down by about 30 per cent so far.

COVID ultimatum hits farmer

A South West regenerative farmer has been forced to potentially close his business because his staff refuse COVID-19 vaccinations.

Jeff Pow runs a small pasture-raised poultry farm and abattoir, which processes about 12,000 chickens a year, in Balingup, with four other farms who also rely on access to his facility.

Mr Pow received orders from the State Government on November 11 which stated it was mandatory for his staff to have at least one dose of the vaccine by December 1.

Despite being fully vaccinated himself, Mr Pow was unable to convince his five staff members, all young Bridgetown locals, to get vaccinated.

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